Talk To Frank resources-for-family

About Talk To Frank

Talk To Frank is an anti-drugs campaign in the United Kingdom that has been running for the longest time. Yet, has it halted anybody taking drugs?

The drug education in the entire UK received a total turn around ten years back when the police Swat team ran into a rural kitchen somewhere in the UK. People were seriously warned to stay away from the drug peddlers around sports arenas and that they could be destroyed by drugs. A sort of comedy was also brought into the message in the bid to pass it appropriately.

The first advert featured a boy calling the police snatch squad on his mother because she wanted to discuss drugs with him. But the new information being passed is "Drugs are illegal. Talking about them isn't. So, Talk to Frank."

Frank Friendly Confidential Drug Advice

An idea that started with someone's mother, Frank was now the new name of the National Drugs Helpline. It was supposed to represent a trusted, big brother figure that young people could call for advice about drugs. Entirety from the ventures of Pablo, the canine medications mule, to a visit cycle a mind, distribution centre has been exhibited under the Frank name, making it a natural brand name among the country's youth.

Significantly, Frank was never found in the flesh, so would never be the objective of joke for wearing the wrong trainers or attempting to be "down with the children," says Justin Tindall, inventive director of ad organization Leo Burnett. Surprisingly, the funny imitations of the Frank videos found on YouTube are quite polite. As there is nothing that remotely suggests Frank is a government project, the campaign is viewed as a first occurrence funded by the government.

Substance education has developed a lot since Nancy Reagan, and in the United Kingdom, Grange Hill cast encouraged teens to simply "Say No" to drugs, a campaign which several professionals now think had the opposite of the desire effect.

The majority of the advertisements in Europe currently concentrate, like Frank, on attempting to share objective info to assist youngsters to make their own choices. You still see pictures of prison bars and upset parents, though, in countries where dealing drugs will get you in serious trouble with the law. A recent campaign launched in Singapore informed young people who visit clubs, "You play, you pay".

In the UK, the Above the Influence campaign has cost the federal government millions of dollars and uses humour and cautionary stories to encourage people to choose positive alternatives to drugs In the ad, teenagers are communicated to in a manner they are familiar with, like some "stoners" being marooned on a couch. But the drug fuelled descent into hell and scare tactics are still used by a surprisingly large number of campaigns around the world. The DrugsNot4Me series recently launched a commercial in Canada that shows a beautiful, self-assured young lady metamorphosis after using "drugs" into a shaking, hollow-eyed mess.

Research that was done on a UK anti-drug campaign between 1999 and 2004 shows that describing the negative effects of abuse will often actually encourage young people "on the margins of society" to use drugs.

The opposition Conservative politicians were initially against Frank, simply because it pointed out the ups and downs of drug use, but it made giant strides.

An early online advertisement told people that cocaine made you feel on of the world.

It was not generally simple to get the balance of the message accurate. Matt Powell, the man behind the cocaine advertisement and then creative director of the digital agency, Profero, currently thinks he formed a too favourable estimate of the attention span of the typical person who browses the Internet. There will be many who could not have seen the adverse effects of the drugs at the end of the animation. The idea behind the ad according to Powell is to make the Frank brand a more honest one by being sincere to teenagers about drugs.

A 67% of the youth say they would ask Frank for advice related to drugs according to the Home Office. The Frank helpline received 225,892 calls and the website received 3,341,777 visits between 2011 and 2012. The argument is that this is proof that the approach is working.

Though, like with any other anti-drug media campaign around the globe, there's no proof that Frank has stopped people to use substances.

In the years since the campaign started, drug use in the UK is down by 9%; however, experts say this might be because marijuana use has declined, most like due to changing attitudes toward smoking tobacco.

What Is Frank?

FRANK is a national drug education program that was established at the Home Office of the British Government and the Department of Health in 2003. It is envisioned to lessen the utilization of both lawful and illicit medications by instructing youngsters as well as teenagers about the potential impacts of medications and liquor. A lot of media campaigns have been put out on both the radio and the internet.

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FRANK offers the following services for those who are looking for info and/or guidance regarding drugs

  • A website
  • 24/7 anonymous telephone number
  • Email
  • A confidential live chat every day from 2 pm - 6 pm
  • A service to find treatment and counselling