Obtaining Help - Treatment getting-help

What Is Drug Addiction?

Drug addiction is a disease that causes long term changes in the brain that's characterized by an uncontrollable urge to seek out and use drugs despite knowledge of all the harmful consequences. Some people whose brain functions have been altered by drugs display some anti-social mannerisms. Substance dependency is also a relapsing illness. Relapsing is when a person starts to use drugs again after he/she attempted to quit.

Addiction starts when the decision to take drugs is first made. However, over time, it becomes increasingly difficult for the person not to do so. Looking for and using the substance becomes uncontrollable. This is mainly because of the effects of long-term substance exposure on the functioning of the brain. Dependence influences parts of the mind required in reward and inspiration, learning and memory plus control over conduct.

Addiction is a sickness that influences both the mind and conduct.

Can Drug Addiction Be Treated?

It isn't easy, but, yes, drug addiction is treatable. Since dependency is a chronic illness, individuals cannot just quit using the substances for a day or two and be cured of it. For most patients, long term often repeated care is needed to help them stop using and continue on to get their lives back.

Ready to Get Help?

CALL US NOW ON 0800 772 3971

Rehabilitation from drug use should result in the patient

  • quit utilising drugs
  • remain drug-free
  • Resuming their responsibilities at home, workplace and community

Standards Of Effective Treatment

Ongoing scientific research since the 1970s has shown that the following basic principles should be the basis of any effective course of treatment

  • Though addiction is very complicated, it could heal completely, and it affects the workings of the human brain and human behaviour.
  • No single treatment is appropriate for everybody.
  • Easy access to rehab is of utmost importance.
  • Successful treatment looks at all the needs of the patient, not simply his/her substance use.
  • It is extremely important to remain under treatment for a very long period of time.
  • The most frequently used forms of treatment are counselling and other behavioural therapies.
  • Together with psychological treatment, pharmaceutical drugs are also administered.
  • Treatment procedures must be measured frequently and altered to fit the patient's evolving needs.
  • Mental illnesses associated with drug dependency need to be treated too.
  • Therapeutically helped detoxification is just the primary phase of treatment.
  • Involuntary treatment for addiction can also be effective.
  • During treatments, the use of drugs by the patient must be properly observed.
  • People who use drugs easily contact communicable diseases such as HIV/AIDS, hepatitis B and C, tuberculosis, and others and as such, they should be tested so that their treatment can be taken into account during rehabilitation.

How Is Drug Addiction Treated?

Effective treatment consists of several steps

  • detox (the process when the body cleanses itself of a substance)
  • Behavioural advising
  • medication (for tobacco, alcohol or opioid dependency)
  • Diagnosis and management mental illness associated with drug addiction such as hopelessness and nervousness
  • Relapse prevention through long-term check-ups

A scope of care with a custom-made treatment program and follow-up choices can be pivotal for achievement.

During the rehabilitation, both physical and psychological issues are treated. The follow-up can compromise family- or community-based recovery support systems.

How Are Medications Used In Drug Addiction Treatment?

Managing withdrawal symptoms, preventing relapse, and treating coexisting conditions are accomplished through medication use.

  • Withdrawal During rehab, taking some prescription drugs assists in reducing withdrawal reactions. Detoxing from the drug is not the only necessary treatment, merely the first step in the process. Patient who doesn't get any further treatment after detoxification as a rule resumes their drug usage. The SAMHSA, 2014 study has shown that about 80% of detox programmes use prescription drugs.
  • Preventing A Relapse A patient can make use of medication to assist in re-establishing normal brain function and reducing cravings. There are medications for the treatment of addictions to alcohol, tobacco/nicotine, and opioids, such as heroin or prescription pain pills. Researchers are creating different solutions to manage stimulant (cocaine, methamphetamine) and cannabis (marijuana) dependence Individuals who utilize more than one drug, which is extremely normal, require treatment for the majority of the substances they utilise.

Behavioural Therapies - How Are They Employed To Treat Drug Dependency?

Behavioural treatments aid patients

  • Change their conducts and practices linked with drug usage
  • develop life skills that are healthy
  • continue receiving medication and other types of treatment

There are a lot of settings and approaches for patients who are seeking treatment.

Outpatient behavioural treatment involves different programs designed for patients with an organised calendar of regular meetings with a counsellor for behavioural health. The majority of the programmes incorporate group or one-to-one substance counselling or both these forms.

These projects normally offer types of behavioural treatment, for example,

  • cognitive-behavioural therapy, which helps patients recognize, avoid, and cope with the situations in which they are most likely to use drugs
  • Multidimensional family therapy, which is for teenage addicts and their families to understand all of the factors influencing the patterns of drug abuse and works on improving the family's ability to function
  • Motivational interviewing has been used to prepare a patient to accept their problem and wants to change their actions by seeking help
  • motivational incentives (contingency management), where abstinence from drugs is rewarded and motivated with positive reinforcements

At first, treatment can be as intensive as multiple outpatient sessions every week. After the completion of the in-depth treatment, a patient moves to frequent outpatient treatment, which does not meet as regularly and for fewer hours every week to assist with maintaining his/her recovery.

Inpatient or private treatment can likewise be extremely compelling, particularly for those with more serious issues (including co-happening conditions). Authorised residential treatment centre offers 24-hour organized and proper care, including safe lodging and medicinal consideration. At the inpatient rehab centres, various treatment procedures are employed all for the benefit of the patient to help them attain a drug-free life void of crime.

Residential treatment setting samples

  • Rigidly structured programs where patients remain inpatient for 6 to 12 months are called therapeutic communities. The entire community, comprising treatment employees and patients in recovery, act as essential agents of change, affecting the patient's understanding, attitude, as well as conduct linked with substance use.
  • Residential treatment that is shorter term usually focuses on detoxification and beginning focused therapy in preparation for follow up in a community based setting.
  • Recovery housing that offers supervised, short-term accommodation for a patient, frequently after other kinds of inpatient/residential treatment. Recovery housing is a great way to help people treatment go back to having an independent life while still having support with things like managing finances, finding employment, and locating support services.

Problems Of Re-Admission

Because drug abuse changes the way the brain functions, a lot of things can trigger drug cravings. Those undergoing treatment, especially in prison or inpatient facilities will find it very useful, as they will understand the best way to handle and overcome the triggers that will face them after recovery.